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What’s on my plate

Simply Wholly Eating What's on my plate

What’s on Deacon’s Plate?

April 6, 2015

Here it is folks. A typical dinner for the wee one. He eats whatever we eat – for the most part. And there are plenty of nights that means omelets because, who has the time?

In this pic we got a little bit of a lot including: Avocado, grass-fed beef, BPA-free beans, Na-nana (AKA: banana) and blue-blues (AKA: blueberries). He probably also got some starch of some sort but, I forgot to photo it. Or maybe he didn’t because I forgot to make it.

I should mention that I hardly ever make dinner for my son but this is one time I got the chance to. My hubby gets home much earlier than I do and manages “Dinner Duty” amongst everything else. (Thanks, honey!)

The point is that dinner does not need to be complicated to be simple and whole.

What's on Deacon's plate

A Day in the MS Life Just Because What's on my plate

Happy Easter!

April 5, 2015

Ladies and Gentlemen, I call this piece of art made by my mother-in-law, “I am human”.

And yes, I ate one. And I loved it. Every last bite of it.

 

Easter cupcake

Simply Wholly Eating What's on my plate

What’s on my plate? Breakfast, lunch and dinner

March 10, 2015
Eggcakes! 1 egg, 1 banana! Add other stuff you love like Flaxseed, hempseed, chia seeds and cook like a normal pancake! My son loves them.

1 egg, 1 banana! Add other stuff you love like Flaxseed, hempseed, chia seeds and cook like a normal pancake! My son loves them.

Kale, beats, carrots, grapes with a lemon/honey dressing. So good.

Kale, beats, carrots, grapes with a lemon/honey dressing. So good.

Wild caught, fresh salmon. Spinach salad with blueberries, strawberries, mango, avocado and a citrus dressing. Yum.

Wild caught, fresh salmon. Spinach salad with blueberries, strawberries, mango, avocado and a citrus dressing. Yum.

A Day in the MS Life Simply Wholly Eating What's on my plate

What to eat if you have an auto-immune disease

February 17, 2015

Some great info on nutrition that supports an anti-inflammatory lifestyle that I am following.

There is a whole body of research emerging now about autoimmune disease and diet. When I was diagnosed in 2001, I was told by my doctor that I should “avoid alfalfa sprouts” and beyond that, it didn’t matter what I ate. While alfalfa sprouts are known to cause reactions in those with lupus, there was a whole world of knowledge about lupus and diet that my rheumatologist completely left out, simply because she wasn’t educated enough on the subject.

I’m glad I didn’t stop searching with that conversation. It turns out that its critical for a person with lupus to not only have an anti-inflammatory diet (which makes sense since autoimmune disease causes so much inflammation in the body) but to cut out foods that reduce inflammation and eat foods that improve and balance immune function. So what are those foods? Continue reading >

Image Source: SetaHealth.WordPress.com